Why is Gen Y such a lonely crowd?

What might this mean for the future of relationships?

Given my concern for the future of relationships, my blogs will often explore reasons I see for the apparent breakdown in the bonds that once held us together. I was therefore Interested and disturbed – but not surprised – to read in the Sydney Morning Herald, July 20, that in a recent survey conducted by Relationships Australia, 30% of those aged 25 to 34 indicated they were frequently lonely, far more than any other age group. The second most lonely were those aged 18-24, 19% of them stating they were frequently lonely.

 

 

 

 

Source   SMH July 20, 201

It is ironic that a major reason for so many who are under 35 feeling lonely today is the connectivity that the internet and mobile technology makes possible!  As the survey revealed there are strong links between a tendency to connect online with loneliness. Continue reading

Does she need to be like a ‘he’ to succeed?

Are you a woman with ambition, trying to achieve in what was once a man’s domain?

If so, it is worth asking yourself:

  • Do you feel pressured to play your work role ‘as if’ a man?
  • If so, where does this pressure come from?
  • What would happen if you played more to your strengths as a woman in your workplace?
  • Would you be more effective in your career and happier in your personal life if you did so?

From my many years of consulting to business and professional women I know that adopting a ‘male persona’ can come at real cost to your health and happiness. While what I call ‘the Maggie Thatcher’ model of doing business may result in career success it can leave you stressed, distressed, and alone. Indeed if you are a single, successful woman who’d also like to share life with a man, then cultivating attributes deemed ‘masculine’ can make it difficult for you to attract and keep that special guy. Continue reading

Time for a New Gender Agenda?

There have been dramatic changes in Western society in the last 40 years when it comes to the expectations we have as men and women, of our lives and relationships. Women can now expect to achieve similarly to a man in the world beyond the home. No longer do the limits imposed by the traditional gender roles, apply: the male as protector and provider; the woman as carer and nurturer.

Yes, these days it is normal for a woman to succeed in roles that until recently were the domain of men. However, it is apparent that some of the gains women have achieved in recent decades have come at considerable cost… for both sexes. Liberation from traditional gender roles has been accompanied by a high incidence of relationship breakdown and divorce – and millions of men and women living singly today when they would prefer to be partnered. Continue reading